Human skills

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Patience. Compassion. Forgiveness. Kindness. Generosity.

These skills are often seen as soft or weak, but in reality they are the hardest to learn and only the strong possess them.

These are not soft skills. These are skills for life. These are human skills. They force us to take a good look at our actions and behaviours and ask ourselves if they are helping us be the people we want to be.

Because we don’t just do these things to be good humans for others, they are as much for ourselves and our own well-being.

We spend less energy being patient than frustrated.

We gain more understanding being compassionate than intolerant.

We feel less pain forgiving than being angry.

Our lives are brighter, happier and filled with more potential being kind and generous than callous.

Don’t take the easy way out – do the hard work on the soft skills. You’ll be glad you did.

A Team Human Conversation

Fight workplace zombies in your organization and join Team Human! Gather a group of fellow workplace zombie hunters to discuss our most recent blog post. Use the questions below to kick start your conversation.

  1. What are some other “human skills”?

  2. Why are they difficult to develop and implement?

  3. What can you do to practice these skills more often?

Forget your failures

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What makes a person successful? Is it innate talent? Charisma? Hard earned skills? The ability to communicate well?

While all these are valuable tools to help you succeed, research has shown that there is one key area that increases a person’s chances of success. And it is an area that we can all develop.

It’s confidence.

Research by Albert Bandura shows that confidence is the strongest predictor of whether a person will set big goals, work through obstacles, be resilient in the face of failure, and eventually reach their goals.

Confidence is about focusing on our strengths and what we do well to plot a path for the future. Rather than trying to mitigate for our weaknesses, we use our skills and abilities to light the way. This allows us to develop the grit necessary to continue when times get tough, to embrace a growth-mindset we need to learn new skills, and to dream big in the first place.

A Team Human Conversation

Fight workplace zombies in your organization and join Team Human! Gather a group of fellow workplace zombie hunters to discuss our most recent blog post. Use the questions below to kick start your conversation.

  1. In your daily life, on a scale of 1-10, how confident are you?

  2. What affects your confidence?

  3. How would focusing on your strengths and abilities impact your life?

A primer to better relationships

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Relationships are the foundation upon which we build success, whether that be success in business or life. Relationships provide us with support and resources. The more positive relationships we have in our life, the more we can draw upon to lift ourselves up. Relationships allow us to persevere when things get rough and leverage opportunities when times are good. But this only happens if we know how to nurture strong connections.

Relationship building is not something we are taught in school nor is it part of the employee’s manual at work. It is something we are expected to know how to do, but most people only have a vague understanding of how to do it.

Relationships can become especially difficult to cultivate at work where we may not share the same values, beliefs, likes and past experiences with our co-workers.

Here’s a primer to building better relationships. If do these four things, you will be on the way to building nurturing stronger relationships at work and home.

1. Don’t make people feel stupid.

No one likes to feel dumb. It’s a big hit to our self-esteem and we will avoid people who make us feel this way.

2. Don’t make people feel unappreciated.

Appreciation is the life blood of relationships. We need to know people value our contributions and recognize what we bring to the table. If we feel unappreciated, we won’t be motivated to give to the relationship.

3. Don’t make people feel unloved.

Belonging is a fundamental human need. We strive to be accepted as part of a group and be provided with the safety and security that it brings. If someone feels like an outcast, they will pull back and not put forth all they have to offer.

4. Don’t make people feel unworthy.

People need to feel valued just for who they are, not only for what they bring to the table. They need to know they are worthy of your time, energy and attention. If they feel unworthy, they won’t be able to bring their best to the relationship.

A Team Human Conversation

Fight workplace zombies in your organization and join Team Human! Gather a group of fellow workplace zombie hunters to discuss our most recent blog post. Use the questions below to kick start your conversation.

  1. What makes a relationship strong?
  2. What makes a relationship weak?
  3. What can you do more of to nurture stronger relationships?

Don't sell yourself short

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Abraham Maslow said, “The story of the human race is the story of men and women selling themselves short.”

Each one of us holds a tremendous amount of potential – different in our own unique way. The problem is we tend to let circumstances, other people and our own attitude dictate whether we realize this potential. The seeds for greatness lie within each of us, but our doubt keeps them buried deep.

One of the most life-changing things we can do for other people is help them see the possibility that they have. It’s easier for us to recognize the abilities of others than to see it in ourselves. When you see someone’s potential – talk about it, ask questions, tell them how you appreciate it, give them some motivation to develop it.

The more we can tap into unused potential, the better our workplaces and world will be, and the happier each of us will be.

A Team Human Conversation

Fight workplace zombies in your organization and join Team Human! Gather a group of fellow workplace zombie hunters to discuss our most recent blog post. Use the questions below to kick start your conversation.

  1. What factors prevent people from seeing their own potential?
  2. What factors have stopped you from acting on your own potential?
  3. What can you do more of to help people realize their potential?

After hours

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If you’re looking to do some self-improvement, doing it on company time isn’t what usually pops into your head.

However, our self-esteem, attitude and how well we are equipped to navigate relationships through our communication, collaboration and conflict skills have a large impact on how successful and productive we will be at work.

The sooner we stop looking at soft skill as less valuable than hard skills and something that happens only on nights and weekends, the better our organizations will be.

A Team Human Conversation

Fight workplace zombies in your organization and join Team Human! Gather a group of fellow workplace zombie hunters to discuss our most recent blog post. Use the questions below to kick start your conversation.

  1. What type of self-development activities have you taken part in?
  2. What soft skills would you like to improve and why?
  3. How can your team/company do more to encourage self-growth in people?

A tip from Mr. Rogers

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Mr. Rogers was a staple for an entire generation of children. From his cozy sweaters (each one knitted by his own mother) to his familiar sneakers, Mr. Rogers showed kids what it meant to be a good person in a world that was sometimes too big and confusing.

And did he know what he was doing. Mr. Rogers advice transcends age. Watch just the last minute of any episode and Mr. Rogers will provide you with the key to improving any relationship in your life whether it be with your spouse, kids, parents, friends, co-workers, supervisor, even a stranger on the street.

He ended every show with this simple statement: “You’ve made this day a special day, by just your being you. There’s no person in the whole world like you, and I like you just the way you are.”

Mr. Rogers knew that deep down inside, we all want to feel appreciated for who we are. To be appreciated means that we are important, that we matter, and that we are worthy. There’s nothing more powerful to growing relationships, or more destructive to them when it is absent, than appreciation.

When we appreciate one another, it truly is a beautiful day in the neighborhood.

A Team Human Conversation

Fight workplace zombies in your organization and join Team Human! Gather a group of fellow workplace zombie hunters to discuss our most recent blog post. Use the questions below to kick start your conversation.

  1. Describe a time when you didn’t feel appreciated. How did it impact the relationship?
  2. What are some ways to show appreciation? Which do you prefer?
  3. What can your team/organization do to promote a culture of appreciation?

Energy then engagement

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We talk a lot about wanting employees to be engaged. We want them to understand the big picture and how they contribute to it. We want them to own the company’s mission and work hard to realize it. After all, engaged employees are productive employees.

What we don’t often hear mentioned is the prerequisite for engagement – energy. It’s hard for employees to be engaged if the right energy isn’t there.

The prevalent energy in a culture will influence how engaged employees are with their work and each other.

Negative energy pushes us apart – it doesn’t feel good and it isn’t motivating. It keeps us closed-off, fearful and discontent. It forces us to focus on problems instead of solutions and to shy away from opportunities for growth.

Positive energy does the exact opposite – it feels good and is motivating. It primes us to do well by keeping us happy, open and willing. It pulls us together and drives us to do what is best for our team and company.

Positive energy opens the doors for engagement whereas negative energy suffocates it.

A Team Human Conversation

Fight workplace zombies in your organization and join Team Human! Gather a group of fellow workplace zombie hunters to discuss our most recent blog post. Use the questions below to kick start your conversation.

  1. How are your attitude and actions different in a positive environment versus a negative environment?
  2. What type of energy does your company/team currently work with?
  3. What can you do as individuals to create/maintain a culture of positive energy?

For the glory

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The racers are gathered at the starting line. Some shift nervously from foot to foot while others laugh and joke with one another. They all know what lies ahead – grueling trails up steep ski slopes, two story rope climbs, sandbag and bucket carries (uphill), barb wire crawls, rings, hoists, cement drags and 8-foot walls, to name a few. An obstacle not completed means the all-dreaded burpees, 30 to be exact. This is Spartan, one of the many popular obstacle course races.

Some will finish the course in under 30 minutes, others will still be out there four hours later. It’s not just a test of strength and endurance, but one of heart.

So why do they do it? Why do they pay to do it? Surely, not just for the medal and t-shirt at the end?

Then a staff member steps in front of the runners and begins to speak:

“The day may come, when the courage of Sparta fails, when we forsake our friends and break all bonds of fellowship, but it is not this day. For this day we fight! And to prepare you for that battle, I’m going to ask you, ‘Who am I?’, to which you shall respond… ‘I am a Spartan!’

He pauses for just a beat, “Who am I?”

“I am a Spartan,” the racers respond, a bit tentatively.

“We are honored by your courage and commitment to excellence, but know this… your mind, body and spirit will all be put to the ultimate test, for you chase glory on this day! Who am I?”

“I am a Spartan!” comes the chorus, louder now.

“Look at the Spartans on your right and your left, you will draw strength from them, as they will draw strength from you, you will not let them fail! Who am I?”

“I am a Spartan,” the racers yell enthusiastically.

“By all that you hold dear on this good Earth, I bid you stand, sons and daughters of Sparta. Stand and fight! For today is the day that you rise to glory. Not tomorrow, not next week, right here! Right now! In your house, your home. Who am I?”

Now the racers are pumped, “I am a Spartan!” they call together.

“Who am I?”

“I am a Spartan!”

“Aroo, aroo, aroo, go!” he calls as they start running.

And this is the reason people flock by the thousands and pay to torture themselves – for the struggle and the glory that comes with it.

We have no issue with hardship, pain and adversity when we can see the victory that lies at the end. In fact, we relish the hard work we need to put in to get there.

We’d do well to remember the Spartan speech when it comes to our workplaces. Employees need to know the triumph that awaits them. They need a worthy cause to draw them together and say to one another, “I will not fail you.” They need to know they are working towards glory.

A Team Human Conversation

Fight workplace zombies in your organization and join Team Human! Gather a group of fellow workplace zombie hunters to discuss our most recent blog post. Use the questions below to kick start your conversation.

  1. When was the last time you took on a daunting challenge? Why did you do it?
  2. What big goal is your team/organization working towards? Is it clear? Is it motivating?
  3. What can you do to get people excited about putting in the work to reach this goal?

Embracing fear

Whether it’s a scary movie on a Friday night, a stomach churning roller coaster, or jumping off the high diving board at the pool, we seek out fear.

Why? It’s anxiety-inducing and uncomfortable. But it’s also exhilarating when we allow it to pull us along. We like the adrenaline rush. It makes us feel alive.

We need fear in our lives. Fear has always kept us on our toes – pushing us to be more aware of dangers, keep an eye out for opportunities and to continue developing our skills.

We need to do things that scare us in our lives – speaking in public, taking a new class, having a tough conversation, stepping into a new role.

Healthy fear pushes us out of our comfort zone and keeps us growing. Don’t shy away from fear, embrace it as a chance to improve yourself.

A Team Human Conversation

Fight workplace zombies in your organization and join Team Human! Gather a group of fellow workplace zombie hunters to discuss our most recent blog post. Use the questions below to kick start your conversation.

  1. When was the last time you did something that scared you?
  2. What did you feel like before, during and after?
  3. How can you embrace your fears more to grow and develop?

Who do you wave at?

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My older brother recently bought a Jeep. When he was down for a visit, he let me take it for a spin. I’ll tell you, even when you’re an adult, you still feel cool when your big brother lets you drive his new set of wheels.

While we were driving, we met another Jeep on the road. “Watch this,” he said. “That person is going to wave at us.”

Sure enough, the person gave us a cheery wave when they drove past. Ever since he’d gotten the Jeep, other Jeep owners had started waving at him on the road. He knew none of them, but by virtues of his new vehicle, he’d entered a special club.

As humans, we strive to build communities with others. We want to find those who are like us and build a place to belong. And when we find those people, we go out of our way to connect, collaborate, share, and help one another. The logic goes, if I see that you are like me, I will help you because at some point I may need you to help me. This is the power of community.

The more we embrace the idea of finding and nurturing connections in our organizations, the stronger and better our teams will be. There is no driving force stronger than a group of people who feel like they are in it together.

A Team Human Conversation

Fight workplace zombies in your organization and join Team Human! Gather a group of fellow workplace zombie hunters to discuss our most recent blog post. Use the questions below to kick start your conversation.

  1. What communities are you part of?
  2. What do you feel like when you are part of a community? What are the benefits?
  3. What can you do in your organization to build a stronger sense of community?

Taken for granted

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At one point I used to think everyone had the same type of imagination that I did. I took for granted that when someone else read a book, the words on the page disappeared and took the form of people, landscapes and events in their head just like in mine. It wasn’t until my husband informed me that this was not the case for him that I began to realize that the things I did naturally were not natural for others.

We do this all the time; forget that we and those around us have hidden skills. We can easily excel on tasks that others on our team would struggle with. And when we play to our strengths, it feels good. It makes winning easier.

Are you insatiable curious, organized, likeable, analytical, dependable, a risk taker, outspoken, determined, an optimist or a pessimist? There are jobs that are suited for each one of these traits and a hundred others.

The more we get to know the strengths we take for granted in ourselves and those hidden in our team members, the better we can do to align ourselves for success.

A Team Human Conversation

Fight workplace zombies in your organization and join Team Human! Gather a group of fellow workplace zombie hunters to discuss our most recent blog post. Use the questions below to kick start your conversation.

  1. What do you do well that you may take for granted?
  2. What are some of the hidden skills of your team members?
  3. How can your team start aligning tasks to take advantage of these strengths?

Light up the sky

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Odds are this past week you had the chance to see some fireworks. Man, do we love them – the lights, the colours, the sounds. Unless you’re a nervous dog or a sleep deprived parent of a baby, fireworks are great.

What I think makes them so popular isn’t necessarily just the fireworks themselves, but the fact that they draw so many of us close in one place to see them. Like we used to huddle around fires in bygone days, we come together in the anticipation of the show. We like being part of something bigger than us. We like the feeling of community fireworks bring, even if just for a short time.

We’d do well to remember this in our workplaces too. What are you doing to bring people together? What promise are you offering to light up the sky with?

A Team Human Conversation

Fight workplace zombies in your organization and join Team Human! Gather a group of fellow workplace zombie hunters to discuss our most recent blog post. Use the questions below to kick start your conversation.

  1. In the past, what “fireworks” brought you together with others while at work?
  2. What does it feel like to be come together as a community?
  3. What does your workplace offer to draw people close to one another?

Two and a half minutes

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While waiting in line for my caffeine fix this morning, the woman ahead of me ordered a sausage breakfast sandwich. The teller called back to ask if they had any sausage ready. “Two and half minutes,” their co-worker replied. The woman shook her head and said she couldn’t wait and ordered the bacon version instead.

I get it, we’re busy. I probably wouldn’t have waited the two and half minutes either. I was already running late.

Two and a half minutes is 150 seconds. Doesn’t seem like much. Seems okay to sacrifice sausage for bacon.

But what else do we sacrifice for the sake of saving 150 seconds?

In two and a half minutes we can offer a helping hand to someone who is frustrated. We can build a stronger connection by listening to a personal story. We can recognize someone’s hard work, talent or dedication. We can ask a question to gain clarification rather than just assuming we know. We can discuss the connection between a project and the bigger picture. We can throw around some new ideas and ways of thinking.

Turns out you can gain a lot in two and half minutes.

A Team Human Conversation

Fight workplace zombies in your organization and join Team Human! Gather a group of fellow workplace zombie hunters to discuss our most recent blog post. Use the questions below to kick start your conversation.

  1. Last week, where would two and half minutes have made a difference?
  2. Where will you try to improve your work or relationships through two and half minutes this week?
  3. What can you do as a team/organization to build a culture where people take the extra time to build stronger connections and do better work?

Don't fear conflict

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Whether it be with your spouse, kids, boss or co-worker, conflict is something that most of us dread. And for good reason; we usually don’t handle it well. Our go-to resolutions like the silent treatment, passive-aggressiveness or anger aren’t much in the way of actual resolutions.

Why do we fear conflict so much? Conflict is a necessity of progress and innovation. We can’t have change without some amount of conflict.

Most of our fear around conflict stems from two reasons: we’re afraid of being wrong, and we’re afraid of the other person being mad at us because we’ve proved them wrong.

We see conflict as forcing someone to be wrong. And let’s face it, no one likes to be wrong. It hits the ego hard.

What if we looked at conflict not as proving anyone wrong, but simply as a mechanism for growth? As a tool to better understand ourselves and others.

If we end up in conflict with someone it just signals to us that we need to slow down and take the time to communicate more with one another.

To do this, we must be willing to:

  • Be open
  • Ask open-ended questions and listen to the answers
  • Examine our own beliefs, values and knowledge
  • Change ourselves if necessary
  •  Help others if they ask for it
  • Give ideas and solutions that benefit not just ourselves
  • Put forth effort and energy for positive outcomes

Conflict isn’t going anywhere, nor should it. The opposite of healthy conflict is stagnation. So, we better get better at handling it.

A Team Human Conversation

Fight workplace zombies in your organization and join Team Human! Gather a group of fellow workplace zombie hunters to discuss our most recent blog post. Use the questions below to kick start your conversation.

  1. What’s your go-to way to handle conflict? How well does it serve you?
  2. What can you do to change how you view and handle conflict?
  3. What can you do as a team to encourage more healthy conflict?

Finding the right word

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Words are powerful. They provide meaning, inspiration and influence. Rudyard Kipling said, “Words are, of course, the most powerful drug used by mankind.” 

Many words we use without a second thought to where they came from; words that play integral roles in our daily lives.

Company is one of those. I work for this company. You work for that company. We do business with the company over there.

But where did the word company come from? According to the Online Etymology Dictionary, the word originates from the Old French word compagnie meaning “society, friendship, intimacy; body of soldiers.” It stands for companionship.

This makes sense even today. The best companies stay true to the original meaning of the word. They are places where employees find belonging with their co-workers and leaders, they trust and help one another, and they fight for something; they have purpose.

A company was never just a place where business is done.

A Team Human Conversation

Fight workplace zombies in your organization and join Team Human! Gather a group of fellow workplace zombie hunters to discuss our most recent blog post. Use the questions below to kick start your conversation.

  1. What does your company do to help employees feel like they belong? What can you do more of?
  2. What have you done in the last week to help a co-worker?
  3. What can you do more of to help people feel like they have a sense of purpose?

The Clean Slate Illusion

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It’s not just about now.

There’s no such thing as living in the moment. We bring a lot of baggage with us to every interaction we’re part of.

Some of it we are conscious of, but much of it subconsciously affects how we think and act.

If you want to positively impact your interactions with others, be aware of the luggage you bring, as well as the possible luggage of those around you.

Examine your own feelings to see if the past may be colouring your actions in a way that isn’t beneficial. If you think someone is acting in a way that doesn’t fit with present expectations, consider exploring if there is something else going on with them that may be affecting their behaviour.

You may not know what other people have packed in their bags, but simply understanding that there is usually more depth to the moment than just today can go a long way to improving relationships.

A Team Human Conversation

Fight workplace zombies in your organization and join Team Human! Gather a group of fellow workplace zombie hunters to discuss our most recent blog post. Use the questions below to kick start your conversation.

  1. Explain a time when past experiences influenced your behaviour with someone.
  2. What can you do to be more in control of how your “luggage” impacts your interactions?
  3. What can you do to be more aware of how other people's “luggage” impacts their interactions?

Why empathy isn’t great

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Empathy is a big buzzword in business right now. Every day we hear about empathetic leaders and teams striving to gain a new edge by tapping into our humanity.

And this is good news. Empathy is an important skill that we should all strive to develop and use. When we can see things from another person’s perspective, it allows us to strengthen relationships in good times and deal with conflict and disagreements in a way that doesn’t destroy them in bad times. Empathy is integral to building the trust that good teams and organizations thrive on.

But empathy does have downsides. First, it’s exhausting. Asking people, especially leaders who must interact with a many people every day with different beliefs, backgrounds and personalities, to constantly put themselves in other people’s shoes is mentally draining. There is only so much in our empathy reserves to draw from until we become drained. And an emotionally drained leader is not a good leader.

Second, empathy doesn’t come innately to everyone. It is a skill that can be developed, but some people have more natural capacities to build on than others. While we can all learn to be more empathetic, we may never be able to fully master it to the degree where it becomes second nature.

There is something other than empathy that we can bring into our workplaces that can be just as useful (if not more) without mentally draining people and that requires little skill or natural ability.

It’s compassion.

Whereas empathy requires us to feel what the other person is feeling and share in their emotions, compassion just requires us to feel for that person and have a desire to help them.

Compassion becomes more useful in building relationships because it’s possible to talk to someone who is experiencing something you’ve never experienced before, but still want to help them. Not having to actually suffer from the effects of negative emotions also allows you to maintain the energy necessary to give the best support.

Where empathy can be debilitating, compassion is uplifting. Studies have shown that compassion may lead to more positive interactions and more eagerness to help others in comparison to empathy.

So, the next time you’re struggling to put yourself in someone else’s shoes – don’t. Stay in your own shoes and put out your hand to help them instead.

A Team Human Conversation

Fight workplace zombies in your organization and join Team Human! Gather a group of fellow workplace zombie hunters to discuss our most recent blog post. Use the questions below to kick start your conversation.

  1. Discuss a time you showed empathy and a time you showed compassion. How were they different?
  2. How could compassion be beneficial to your team?
  3. How can you encourage more compassion in your organization/team?

Who do you want on your team?

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Who’s the best person to have on a team?

Is it the person with all the skills?

Is it the person with the silver-tongue?

Is it the person filled with knowledge?

Is it the person who knows everyone?

While all these people can be valuable components of a team, the best person to have on a team is the one who can move it forward, rather than holding it back.

This is the person who listens and asks questions to draw out more information and ideas.

This is the person who makes others feel they are heard and have influence on the team.

This is the person who doesn’t shy away from conflict but brings it into the light in a respectful way and uses it to fix the shortcomings of the team.

This is the person who is open to differing opinions and is eager to build on the ideas of others.

This is the person who brings a positive attitude to the team.

The best person to have on a team isn’t the person with the most talent and know-how, it is the one who can see the unique value in their team members and draw it out for the benefit of all.

The only question you need to answer is, is this you?

A Team Human Conversation

Fight workplace zombies in your organization and join Team Human! Gather a group of fellow workplace zombie hunters to discuss our most recent blog post. Use the questions below to kick start your conversation.

  1. Think of a team you were part of that didn't work well together. What issues influenced this? 
  2. Think of a team you were part of that did work well together. What issues influenced this?
  3. What can you work on to be the team member that moves your team forward?

Strong leaders are kind leaders

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What makes a great leader?

We could list a hundred traits that a good leader has: vision, transparency, honesty, accountability, confidence, positive attitude, passion, communication skills, and the list goes on.

But a study by The Zenger Folkmam found one necessary trait that is usually left out of the leadership conversation but is crucial to leadership effectiveness and success.

The study tracked 51, 836 leaders and uncovered that those who expressed warmth were the most effective. Without the ability to be warm and kind, leaders were not seen as likeable and it severely reduced their ability to lead their teams well. This included building positive relationships, mentoring and coaching, encouraging cooperation and being a source of inspiration.

When a leader is kind, it improves trust, boosts employee health, increases creativity and reduces attrition.

There’s strength in kindness.

A Team Human Conversation

Fight workplace zombies in your organization and join Team Human! Gather a group of fellow workplace zombie hunters to discuss our most recent blog post. Use the questions below to kick start your conversation.

  1. Being a leader is similar to being a parent, discuss how warmth and kindness impact these two roles.
  2. Describe a leader who has shown warmth and kindness, how did it impact you?
  3. How can leaders in your organization cultivate more warmth and kindness?

Leadership and lettuce

“When you plant lettuce, if it does not grow well, you don't blame the lettuce. You look for reasons it is not doing well. It may need fertilizer, or more water, or less sun. You never blame the lettuce. Yet if we have problems with our friends or family, we blame the other person. But if we know how to take care of them, they will grow well, like the lettuce. Blaming has no positive effect at all, nor does trying to persuade using reason and argument. That is my experience. No blame, no reasoning, no argument, just understanding. If you understand, and you show that you understand, you can love, and the situation will change.”

― Thich Nhat Hanh

When we think about leadership, we often think it is about getting stuff done. But leadership isn’t about what you do, it’s about what other people do. A leader’s job is not to complete tasks, but rather to create the right environment for tasks to be completed in.

This is done on two levels – company culture and individual needs.

Leaders craft the culture by showing what attitudes and behaviour are expected and allowed. They model the organization’s values and act as spokespeople for the mission and vision. Or they don’t. The overall culture of an organization will influence how committed employees are to one another and the organization, and how engaged they are with their work.

Leaders must also understand their team as individuals. They need to learn what makes them tick and work with them to ensure they have what they need to reach their full potential. Just as peppers have different needs than carrots, leaders must understand that their people are not one-sized-fits-all and adjust their approach accordingly.

When leaders tend to these two areas, everyone reaps the benefits.

A Team Human Conversation

Fight workplace zombies in your organization and join Team Human! Gather a group of fellow workplace zombie hunters to discuss our most recent blog post. Use the questions below to kick start your conversation.

  1. In your opinion, what are the responsibilities of a leader?
  2. What makes a leader “great”?
  3. What are the top three skills/abilities a leader should have?